Paperback Í Shadow Land eBook Ò


Shadow Land This tale of supernatural horror from the author of Koko , The Talisman and Mr X concerns two boys at a New England boarding school Del introduces Tom to his world of magic tricks But at Shadowland Del s uncle s lakeside estate their hobby suddenly takes on muchsinister tones ❰EPUB❯ ✹ Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald – The Original Screenplay (Fantastic Beasts/Grindelwald) Author J.K Rowling – 9facts.co.uk The Talisman and Mr X concerns two boys at a New England boarding school Del introduces Tom to his world of magic tricks But at Shadowland Del s uncle s lakeside estate their hobby suddenly takes on muchsinister tones Some of thesurreal moments, as well as the occasional switches in narratives, made this book a little hard to follow at times, but there IS a reason I gave this book five stars it was terrific It s not the all out horror fest that the cover of the 1980 s paperback promised, but there were some truly gruesome scenes towards the climax, as well as a general tone of mounting tension throughout.Tom Flanagan is a very memorably three dimensional young protagonist, and all the conflicts of c Some of thesurreal moments, as well as the occasional switches in narratives, made this book a little hard to follow at times, but there IS a reason I gave this book five stars it was terrific It s not the all out horror fest that the cover of the 1980 s paperback promised, but there were some truly gruesome scenes towards the climax, as well as a general tone of mounting tension throughout.Tom Flanagan is a very memorably three dimensional young protagonist, and all the conflicts of childhood innocence and naivete being challenged by oncoming adulthood and in this case, someunusual challenges make him all thebelievable.The twisting narratives, like multiple concentric circles overlapping each other at times are also highly engrossing, and never boring not even the miniature stories which have everything to do with the plot, and cannot be skipped The only thing that I fear may turn a lot of readers off is the slow buildup of the first 140 pages or so, describing the boys in school I cannot begin to tell you how important it all is to the story later on it s not just filler Shadowland was an enchanting read, and all thewelcome for its subject matter in the wake of the Harry Potter phenomenon Seriously read it, and enjoy it thoroughly This book I read when I was a teenager It is a fantastic book by a literary great.Finished reading it again recently while I was away I enjoyed it again Five stars. Peter Straub came to prominence in 1979 with Ghost Story, an old fashioned spooky ghost tale which I wasn t really a fan of though I appreciate it A year later, in 1980, he published Shadowland, a coming of age novel which can be classified as dark fantasy with horror elements This time, I say, he penned a winner Shadowland is concerned with the friendship of two boys Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale which began at the private all male school they both attended As both try to fight the Peter Straub came to prominence in 1979 with Ghost Story, an old fashioned spooky ghost tale which I wasn t really a fan of though I appreciate it A year later, in 1980, he published Shadowland, a coming of age novel which can be classified as dark fantasy with horror elements This time, I say, he penned a winner Shadowland is concerned with the friendship of two boys Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale which began at the private all male school they both attended As both try to fight the horrors all young boys have to suffer at one stage of their lives or another, Del introduces Tom to his world of magic tricks When they both decide to spend the summer at Del s Uncle s house in New England, Tom discovers that things can be muchsinister than they seem At Shadowland, their lives will be changed forever and after that summer nothing will be the same Shadowland is a beautiful novel unlike most fantasy or horror works Straub is a master prose stylist who crafts to perfection he wrote the novel longhand in multiple journals, and then retyped it on a typewriter who can imagine a writer doing that nowadays and the result is an intricately detailed work, structurally complex and above all, stylish Opening with a prologue which reads like a feverish dream which makes us see the strangest things, the novel expertly morphs into a coming of age school story, and only after that unleashes its full power Straub introduces characters, plots and subplots within those, but nothing is without purpose in this story he draws heavily on various folk tales and even includes some of his own making thereby seducing the reader who is surprised with each revelation and the horror is only starting From the afterword That same year, I had been moved by John Fowles novel, The Magus, which suggested a way to unite the powerful strangeness resulting from the oral tradition withconventional narrative satisfactions No one familiar with The Magus who reads Shadowland can fail to notice Fowles influence on me, which was profound and pervasive but this influence was above all liberating, not enslaving Fowles demonstrated how the seductive uncertainty implicit in theatrical illusion and, evenimportantly, the emotional effects of this uncertainty, could find expression in a narrative that itself moved through successive layers of surprise, doubt, suspicion, and uncertainty.Reading Shadowland is much like witnessing a spectacle of illusion and the uncertainity it evokes The aura that something is terribly wrong never leaves, and if an enchantment was cast, it is a dark and haunting one One of the things that are immediately noticeable is Straub s shift in approach to horror Ghost Story was largely constrained by the Victorian history of the genre, where the horror needed to be subtle and only hinted at Though Shadowland is a subtle and suggestive work, it escapes this convenction and Straub plays with the subtle and blalant terror wth marvelous results Shadowland is a masterful, unacknowledged work by a writer who has remained in the shadows far, far too long Peter Straub possesses an imagination without boundaries along with the gift of marvelous storytelling and the ability of bringing things to life with the most amazing imagery and constructing atmosphere that is gothic, unsettling, elusive and hallucinatory all at once Intriguing and complex, Shadowland will please every reader who enjoys well crafed fiction that demands full attention and forces to think about what it presents A truly magical tale Strange to think that a perfectly good novel can be ruined by a few missteps, but that s the case for me here Shadowland is, for the most part, impeccably written Straub is a smart author, an intellectual even, and the rather clinical arm s length he keeps from his subject and characters is interesting and distinctive Although that means empathy with his protagonists is nearly impossibly to achieve, I don t necessarily need that if there are things happening that keep my mind active and my im Strange to think that a perfectly good novel can be ruined by a few missteps, but that s the case for me here Shadowland is, for the most part, impeccably written Straub is a smart author, an intellectual even, and the rather clinical arm s length he keeps from his subject and characters is interesting and distinctive Although that means empathy with his protagonists is nearly impossibly to achieve, I don t necessarily need that if there are things happening that keep my mind active and my imagination engaged So it s not the distance that made me give this 1 star, it s how Straub loses control of the effects that he is trying to create The first third or so, set at an academy, was mainly fascinating But later, when the fireworks and the dreamworks start happening, so did the bloat It all became a case of trying too hard for too long Those dream sequences were grueling The climactic series of magical battles were at first annoying, and then overwritten, and eventually boring I did not expect this book to become a slog, but that s what it became for me It didn t help that the framing of the story a journalist writing an article was pointless and unnecessarily distancing, in a book that already has a clear lack of feeling Bonus critique the fate of one of the central characters was a pathetic joke And I mean that literally it was a ridiculous and mean spirited joke, one based on the character s last name, and it was awful to see a sympathetic character treated in such an offhand way Not just by the villain of course, but by the author The gloss of it being an inspirational death ugh only barely concealed the disdain and disinterest underneath.So yeah, this was a good book, until it became the shadow of a good book Get it How s that for a cheap joke, Straub.PLACEHOLDER REVIEW Something better I hope because this one involved a lot of Huh Oh, that s what s happening Sigh And repeat.RTC, maybe, if the interest can be magically summoned

    ❰EPUB❯ ✹ Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald – The Original Screenplay (Fantastic Beasts/Grindelwald) Author J.K Rowling – 9facts.co.uk The Talisman and Mr X concerns two boys at a New England boarding school Del introduces Tom to his world of magic tricks But at Shadowland Del s uncle s lakeside estate their hobby suddenly takes on muchsinister tones Some of thesurreal moments, as well as the occasional switches in narratives, made this book a little hard to follow at times, but there IS a reason I gave this book five stars it was terrific It s not the all out horror fest that the cover of the 1980 s paperback promised, but there were some truly gruesome scenes towards the climax, as well as a general tone of mounting tension throughout.Tom Flanagan is a very memorably three dimensional young protagonist, and all the conflicts of c Some of thesurreal moments, as well as the occasional switches in narratives, made this book a little hard to follow at times, but there IS a reason I gave this book five stars it was terrific It s not the all out horror fest that the cover of the 1980 s paperback promised, but there were some truly gruesome scenes towards the climax, as well as a general tone of mounting tension throughout.Tom Flanagan is a very memorably three dimensional young protagonist, and all the conflicts of childhood innocence and naivete being challenged by oncoming adulthood and in this case, someunusual challenges make him all thebelievable.The twisting narratives, like multiple concentric circles overlapping each other at times are also highly engrossing, and never boring not even the miniature stories which have everything to do with the plot, and cannot be skipped The only thing that I fear may turn a lot of readers off is the slow buildup of the first 140 pages or so, describing the boys in school I cannot begin to tell you how important it all is to the story later on it s not just filler Shadowland was an enchanting read, and all thewelcome for its subject matter in the wake of the Harry Potter phenomenon Seriously read it, and enjoy it thoroughly This book I read when I was a teenager It is a fantastic book by a literary great.Finished reading it again recently while I was away I enjoyed it again Five stars. Peter Straub came to prominence in 1979 with Ghost Story, an old fashioned spooky ghost tale which I wasn t really a fan of though I appreciate it A year later, in 1980, he published Shadowland, a coming of age novel which can be classified as dark fantasy with horror elements This time, I say, he penned a winner Shadowland is concerned with the friendship of two boys Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale which began at the private all male school they both attended As both try to fight the Peter Straub came to prominence in 1979 with Ghost Story, an old fashioned spooky ghost tale which I wasn t really a fan of though I appreciate it A year later, in 1980, he published Shadowland, a coming of age novel which can be classified as dark fantasy with horror elements This time, I say, he penned a winner Shadowland is concerned with the friendship of two boys Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale which began at the private all male school they both attended As both try to fight the horrors all young boys have to suffer at one stage of their lives or another, Del introduces Tom to his world of magic tricks When they both decide to spend the summer at Del s Uncle s house in New England, Tom discovers that things can be muchsinister than they seem At Shadowland, their lives will be changed forever and after that summer nothing will be the same Shadowland is a beautiful novel unlike most fantasy or horror works Straub is a master prose stylist who crafts to perfection he wrote the novel longhand in multiple journals, and then retyped it on a typewriter who can imagine a writer doing that nowadays and the result is an intricately detailed work, structurally complex and above all, stylish Opening with a prologue which reads like a feverish dream which makes us see the strangest things, the novel expertly morphs into a coming of age school story, and only after that unleashes its full power Straub introduces characters, plots and subplots within those, but nothing is without purpose in this story he draws heavily on various folk tales and even includes some of his own making thereby seducing the reader who is surprised with each revelation and the horror is only starting From the afterword That same year, I had been moved by John Fowles novel, The Magus, which suggested a way to unite the powerful strangeness resulting from the oral tradition withconventional narrative satisfactions No one familiar with The Magus who reads Shadowland can fail to notice Fowles influence on me, which was profound and pervasive but this influence was above all liberating, not enslaving Fowles demonstrated how the seductive uncertainty implicit in theatrical illusion and, evenimportantly, the emotional effects of this uncertainty, could find expression in a narrative that itself moved through successive layers of surprise, doubt, suspicion, and uncertainty.Reading Shadowland is much like witnessing a spectacle of illusion and the uncertainity it evokes The aura that something is terribly wrong never leaves, and if an enchantment was cast, it is a dark and haunting one One of the things that are immediately noticeable is Straub s shift in approach to horror Ghost Story was largely constrained by the Victorian history of the genre, where the horror needed to be subtle and only hinted at Though Shadowland is a subtle and suggestive work, it escapes this convenction and Straub plays with the subtle and blalant terror wth marvelous results Shadowland is a masterful, unacknowledged work by a writer who has remained in the shadows far, far too long Peter Straub possesses an imagination without boundaries along with the gift of marvelous storytelling and the ability of bringing things to life with the most amazing imagery and constructing atmosphere that is gothic, unsettling, elusive and hallucinatory all at once Intriguing and complex, Shadowland will please every reader who enjoys well crafed fiction that demands full attention and forces to think about what it presents A truly magical tale Strange to think that a perfectly good novel can be ruined by a few missteps, but that s the case for me here Shadowland is, for the most part, impeccably written Straub is a smart author, an intellectual even, and the rather clinical arm s length he keeps from his subject and characters is interesting and distinctive Although that means empathy with his protagonists is nearly impossibly to achieve, I don t necessarily need that if there are things happening that keep my mind active and my im Strange to think that a perfectly good novel can be ruined by a few missteps, but that s the case for me here Shadowland is, for the most part, impeccably written Straub is a smart author, an intellectual even, and the rather clinical arm s length he keeps from his subject and characters is interesting and distinctive Although that means empathy with his protagonists is nearly impossibly to achieve, I don t necessarily need that if there are things happening that keep my mind active and my imagination engaged So it s not the distance that made me give this 1 star, it s how Straub loses control of the effects that he is trying to create The first third or so, set at an academy, was mainly fascinating But later, when the fireworks and the dreamworks start happening, so did the bloat It all became a case of trying too hard for too long Those dream sequences were grueling The climactic series of magical battles were at first annoying, and then overwritten, and eventually boring I did not expect this book to become a slog, but that s what it became for me It didn t help that the framing of the story a journalist writing an article was pointless and unnecessarily distancing, in a book that already has a clear lack of feeling Bonus critique the fate of one of the central characters was a pathetic joke And I mean that literally it was a ridiculous and mean spirited joke, one based on the character s last name, and it was awful to see a sympathetic character treated in such an offhand way Not just by the villain of course, but by the author The gloss of it being an inspirational death ugh only barely concealed the disdain and disinterest underneath.So yeah, this was a good book, until it became the shadow of a good book Get it How s that for a cheap joke, Straub.PLACEHOLDER REVIEW Something better I hope because this one involved a lot of Huh Oh, that s what s happening Sigh And repeat.RTC, maybe, if the interest can be magically summoned"/>
  • Paperback
  • Shadow Land
  • Peter Straub
  • English
  • 27 June 2019
  • 0006163289

About the Author: Peter Straub

Peter Straub was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 2 March, 1943, the first of three sons of a salesman and a nurse The salesman wanted him to become an athlete, the nurse thought he would do well as either a doctor or a Lutheran minister, but all he wanted to do was to learn to read.When kindergarten turned out to be a stupefyingly banal disappointment devoted to cutting animal shapes out of heavy colored paper, he took matters into his own hands and taught himself to read by memorizing his comic books and reciting them over and over to other neighborhood children on the front steps until he could recognize the words Therefore, when he finally got to first grade to find everyone else laboring over the imbecile adventures of Dick, Jane and Spot See Spot run See, see, see he ransacked the library in search of pirates, soldiers, detectives, spies, criminals, and other colorful souls, Soon he had earned a reputation as an ace storyteller, in demand around campfires and in back yards on summer evenings.This career as the John Buchan to the first grade was interrupted by a collision between himself and an automobile which resulted in a classic near death experience, many broken bones, surgical operations, a year out of school, a lengthy tenure in a wheelchair, and certain emotional quirks Once back on his feet, he quickly acquired a severe stutter which plagued him into his twenties and now and then still puts in a nostalgic appearance, usually to the amusement of telephone operators and shop clerks Because he had learned prematurely that the world was dangerous, he was jumpy, restless, hugely garrulous in spite of his stutter, physically uncomfortable and, at least until he began writing horror three decades later, prone to nightmares Books took him out of himself, so he read eventhan earlier, a youthful habit immeasurably valuable to any writer And his storytelling, for in spite of everything he was still a sociable child with a lot of friends, took a turn toward the dark and the garish, toward the ghoulish and the violent He found his first effect when he discovered that he could make this kind of thing funny.As if scripted, the rest of life followed He went on scholarship to Milwaukee Country Day School and was the darling of his English teachers He discovered Thomas Wolfe and Jack Kerouac, patron saints of wounded and self conscious adolescence, and also, blessedly, jazz music, which spoke of utterance beyond any constraint passion and liberation in the form of speech on the far side of the verbal border The alto saxophone player Paul Desmond, speaking in the voice of a witty and inspired angel, epitomized ideal expressiveness, Our boy still had no idea why inspired speech spoke best when it spoke in code, the simultaneous terror and ecstasy of his ancient trauma, as well as its lifelong so far, anyhow legacy of anger, being so deeply embedded in the self as to be imperceptible, Did he behave badly, now and then Did he wish to shock, annoy, disturb, and provoke Are you kidding Did he also wish to excel, to keep panic and uncertainty at arm s length by good old main force effort Make a guess So here we have a pure but unsteady case of denial happily able to maintain itself through merciless effort Booted along by invisible fears and horrors, this fellow was rewarded by wonderful grades and a vague sense of a mysterious but transcendent wholeness available through expression He went to the University of Wisconsin and, after opening his eyes to the various joys of Henry James, William Carlos Williams, and the Texas blues rocker Steve Miller, a great joyous character who lived across the street, passed through essentially unchanged to emerge in 1965 with an honors degree in English, then an MA at Columbia a year later He thought actual writing was probably beyond him even though actual writing was probably what he was best at down crammed he many and many a book, stirred by


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