Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and


Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It's Killing Us In this reasoned exploration of justice, retribution, and redemption, the champion of the new monastic movement, popular speaker, and author of the bestselling The Irresistible Revolution offers a powerful and persuasive appeal for the abolition of the death penaltyThe Bible says an eye for an eye But is the state s taking of a life true or even practical punishment for convicted prisoners In this thought provoking work, Shane Claiborne explores the issue of the death penalty and the contrast between punitive justice and restorative justice, questioning our notions of fairness, revenge, and absolutionUsing an historical lens to frame his argument, Claiborne draws on testimonials and examples from Scripture to show how the death penalty is not the ideal of justice that many believe Not only is a life lost, so too, is the possibility of mercy and grace In Executing Grace, he reminds us of the divine power of forgiveness, and evokes the fundamental truth of the Gospel that no one, even a criminal, is beyond redemption ➹ [Read] ➵ Analysis of Pesticides in Food and Environmental Samples, Second Edition By Jose L Tadeo ➼ – 9facts.co.uk retribution [PDF] ❤ Practical Research Methods in Education By Mike Lambert – 9facts.co.uk and redemption [Download] ✤ On the Edge of the Empires (2nd - 4th C. Ce) Author Rocco Palermo – 9facts.co.uk the champion of the new monastic movement ❮BOOKS❯ ✮ Prophecy, Behaviour and Change Author Gerald G Smale – 9facts.co.uk popular speaker [PDF / Epub] ★ Applied Econometrics By Chung-Ki Min – 9facts.co.uk and author of the bestselling The Irresistible Revolution offers a powerful and persuasive appeal for the abolition of the death penaltyThe Bible says an eye for an eye But is the state s taking of a life true or even practical punishment for convicted prisoners In this thought provoking work ➹ [Download] ➵ Sea Serpents, Sailors, and Sceptics By Graham J. McEwan ➼ – 9facts.co.uk Shane Claiborne explores the issue of the death penalty and the contrast between punitive justice and restorative justice ❮Reading❯ ➸ Neoliberal Structural Change and the Electricity Sector Author Lynne Chester – 9facts.co.uk questioning our notions of fairness [Reading] ➿ Values and Institutions in Health Research Regulation By Shawn H E Harmon – 9facts.co.uk revenge ❴PDF / Epub❵ ☄ Fathering in Cultural Contexts Author Jaipaul L. Roopnarine – 9facts.co.uk and absolutionUsing an historical lens to frame his argument ❮Read❯ ➬ Psychology and Culture Author Lisa Vaughn – 9facts.co.uk Claiborne draws on testimonials and examples from Scripture to show how the death penalty is not the ideal of justice that many believe Not only is a life lost ❮PDF / Epub❯ ✅ Fathering in Cultural Contexts Author Jaipaul L. Roopnarine – 9facts.co.uk so too ☃ [PDF / Epub] ☂ Wealth, Inclusive Growth and Sustainability By Shunsuke Managi ✑ – 9facts.co.uk is the possibility of mercy and grace In Executing Grace [PDF] ✅ Routledge Handbook of Food in Asia By Cecilia Leong-Salobir – 9facts.co.uk he reminds us of the divine power of forgiveness [Download] ➽ Public Education Reform and Network Governance By Philip Wing Keung Chan – 9facts.co.uk and evokes the fundamental truth of the Gospel that no one ➷ [Reading] ➹ Women Choosing Silence By Alison Woolley ➬ – 9facts.co.uk even a criminal [Download] ➾ Francis Bacons Contribution to Shakespeare ➼ Barry R Clarke – 9facts.co.uk is beyond redemption


10 thoughts on “Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It's Killing Us

  1. Heather Heather says:

    BOOM Shane Claiborne just dropped the mic I already agreed with his views on the death penalty, but I learned a lot from this book Claiborne supports his statements not only with the Bible but also a great deal of historical and legal research, so Christians and non Christians alike will get a lot out of it.


  2. Jon Seward Jon Seward says:

    Second book in a row I ve read about the death penalty and it completely cements my opposition to it Fantastic book and the facts and stories Shane uses evoked a ton of emotions in me We as a culture truly need to rethink the death penalty Anyone and everyone should read this.


  3. Paul Fike Paul Fike says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Shane Claiborne does a masterful job dismantling the pervasive default death penalty advocacy so prominent among many evangelicals and fundamentalists The outline of the book made his argument very persuasive Starting with the perspectives of the victims surviving family members of those murdered , proceeding to pertinent biblical material rooted in grace throughout , Jesus execution, early Christian leaders unambiguous stance against the death penalty, the decline in support for state spon Shane Claiborne does a masterful job dismantling the pervasive default death penalty advocacy so prominent among many evangelicals and fundamentalists The outline of the book made his argument very persuasive Starting with the perspectives of the victims surviving family members of those murdered , proceeding to pertinent biblical material rooted in grace throughout , Jesus execution, early Christian leaders unambiguous stance against the death penalty, the decline in support for state sponsored execution, the inequalities of execution by race, as well as, the history of lynching in the US, the Death Penalty s Hall of Shame which include botched executions, wrongful executions, as well as, mental illness and execution , putting a face on the issue and the innocent, and the awful toll executions take on those administering it The concluding chapter is a vision of justice and the dream of the death of execution Before reading this book I was ambivalent concerning the death penalty No longer Claiborne s new vision of justice is one the should be explored and enacted if the administration of justice is to ever recover it s redemptive value and move beyond further violence, retribution, and vengeance


  4. Erin *Help I’m Reading and I Can’t Get Up* Erin *Help I’m Reading and I Can’t Get Up* says:

    Absolutely fantastic Filled to bursting with grace, tempered with realism, breathing hope Do yourself a favor and, as you read it, take a moment on every new page to read aloud the names of the executed that scroll along the bottom Look them up when a name catches your attention Pray for them, their families, and the victims of the crimes they were executed for Pray for the end of the death penalty in America.


  5. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    This is one of those books I wish I could make everyone read.


  6. Johanna Johanna says:

    This was not my style I am grateful authors are writing about these topics for Christian conservatives in a way that Christian conservatives can hear and understand, but I m just not able to read this type of book any as an exvangelical I was halfway through before Claiborne mentioned race, which is honestly horrific for a book on the criminal justice system and the death penalty Yet there were so many chapters on the Bible and Jesus, and I just no longer understand why that scompel This was not my style I am grateful authors are writing about these topics for Christian conservatives in a way that Christian conservatives can hear and understand, but I m just not able to read this type of book any as an exvangelical I was halfway through before Claiborne mentioned race, which is honestly horrific for a book on the criminal justice system and the death penalty Yet there were so many chapters on the Bible and Jesus, and I just no longer understand why that scompelling than just valuing humanity because it s the right thing to do That said, he DID talk about race I was afraid he wasn t going to even address it The second chapter Claiborne tells like 800 stories about victims and victims families who did not want the perpetrator executed I of course think what victims want is essential to finding justice, but I don t feel like random anecdotes is the right way to get to that There were too many stories, too many of the same stories we forgive you reinforcing the Christian narrativethan anything else , and almost no statistics about restorative justice and victims rights opinions In chapter 3, Claiborne goes over the list of people in the Bible who were murderers and says that we wouldn t have half our Bible without grace But I don t really feel like grace is why those folks are included.to me, it feels a lotlike patriarchy,like an allowance for men to do whatever they want without consequences God wasn t the one who compiled our Bible as it is today it was a group of people People allowed the books in because they felt there was evidence enough to believe these are the divinely inspired books, so it was human s choice to include these books despite the writers actions and characters like David, who the author calls a womanizer, but who actually was a murderer and rapist , not God s issuance of grace And I just felt a lot of this was super cheesy At first I thought that I was obsessed with death, but then I realized that I am obsessed with grace Major eyerolls All that said even though this is not at all my style, there were some things I strongly disagreed with, I didn t learn what I hoped to learn about the inhumanity of the death penalty, and I didn t learn a new way to engage with criminal punishment IF this is an avenue for conservative Christians to begin questioning what they believe about the death penalty, then I m glad this book exists


  7. Brandon Carter Brandon Carter says:

    I ll tell you right off the bat, the only thing that I disliked about this book was the fact that it had to end That s saying something I have a degree in Criminal Justice, and so when I read a book about the death penalty or the criminal justice system, the bar to impress me is pretty darn high Not to mention, I ve done a lot of reading and investigation about the death penalty over the years It s always had kind of a macabre fascination with it I remember when I was younger I d read about I ll tell you right off the bat, the only thing that I disliked about this book was the fact that it had to end That s saying something I have a degree in Criminal Justice, and so when I read a book about the death penalty or the criminal justice system, the bar to impress me is pretty darn high Not to mention, I ve done a lot of reading and investigation about the death penalty over the years It s always had kind of a macabre fascination with it I remember when I was younger I d read about it from the college textbooks that my dad would bring home I ve also written two position papers on it, one in high school, and one in college at Weber State In high school I was for it, but by the time I hit college, especially the second time around, I was done with it If you ve read blogs of mine on this issue, you ll know why I loved this book.If you re not familiar with Shane Claiborne, he s a Christian activist author, the Director of Red Letter Christians, and the founding member of The Simple Way, a radical faith community in inner city Philadelphia Shane is one of those people who thinks that all those things that Jesus said about loving your neighbor and loving your enemies weren t just suggestions, and that we ought to try to live those words He and others like Craig Greenfield really inspire me.Part of the premise of this book is to evaluate why Christians in America seem to love the death penalty As he says, the death penalty has not survived in spite of Christians, but because of us That s really kind of sad Why would we support the legalized murder of another human being After all, our Lord and Savior was executed by the state, so why should we be in favor of that To answer this, Claiborne dives head first into the Bible to explore the scripture and theology, from the Old Testament and the New, that is used to justify the Death Penalty Of course anyone with a passing familiarity with the Bible knows about the death penalty in the Old Testament, which touts An eye for an eye, and all of those things in the Law of Moses that can get you executed However, when you really start to dig into it, the Old Testament, as bloody and violent as it often is, doesn t record all that many executions After all, why didn t God execute Cain after he murdered Abel In fact God actually protected Cain from those who would take vengeance on him Genesis 4 15 16 Moses murdered a man and wasn t executed Same thing with King David If God was really all about the death penalty, why weren t these men killed for their high crimes Claiborne gets into this and also discusses the history and theology of An eye for an eye, as well as Romans 13 which is often used as a justification for the death penalty in the New Testament Spoiler Alert both Claiborne and the early church fathers read that passage very differently.Claiborne then moves onto some of the theology behind the Atonement of Christ on the Cross, and a discussion about how the Crucified Christ became a symbol of solidarity and hope with the African American community that suffered through the lynch mobs of the late 19th and early 20th centuries It s one of the most powerful parts of the book, and really helps to strengthen his case for Christians to be against the death penalty.With his theological underpinnings discussed and his case made, he switches gears to the death penalty in the modern United States and how we administer it The facts he presents are damning There are around 3,000 inmates awaiting execution in the USA Meanwhile, 156 death row inmates have been exonerated and found innocent since 1973 Of course, it would be dumb to think that our courts have caught all the errors, and it s a certainty that we have executed innocent people in the United States The United States is 5th in the world in executions performed every year behind only China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq Hardly the kind of company we want to keep Meanwhile, since 1976, 92.8 percent of executions have taken place in just 15 of the 50 states, largely in the Bible Belt Also, 85% of US counties have not executed anyone in the last 45 years, and 80% of counties in America have no one on their state s death row In fact if we took out Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi, then we d be left with very few executions in the USA every year Meanwhile polls are starting to show that when presented with an alternative like life in prison, a majority of Americans are now against the death penalty Could the death penalty be dying Claiborne hopes so, and so do I Throughout the book he recounts the horrors of botched executions, cases where people who were almost certainly innocent have been executed, stories of former wardens and prison officials who are forever haunted by their participation in the machinery of death, and of many, MANY people who are working to defeat this sentence and save people from state approved homicide.Of course, you wouldn t be blamed for thinking, but what about the victims and their families Shouldn t they have a say somewhere in here Yes, Claiborne says, they should However, he spends a whole chapter talking about how actually quite a few families of victims are against the death penalty, and about how some of them have even been threatened by the state for daring to speak out against it It s not as black and white as it looks Life isn t usually that way, and death almost never is.However, perhaps the most moving parts of the book are the personal stories that Claiborne shares throughout it These are real stories of grace, radical grace There are stories of murderers finding forgiveness and grace, of victims moving beyond pain and violence to reach out and extend that grace to criminals, and about men and women who have still gone to their deaths after receiving that grace for themselves.I have to give this book 5 stars I really think that every Christian, every person of faith, should read it I think if you do, you ll be hard pressed to come away from it without at least having your opinions and thoughts on the death penalty truly challenged


  8. Joanna Lampa Joanna Lampa says:

    I want to read this tentimes to really digest it all He says chapter 9 is R rated, but I think the entire book is I was sick to my stomach, then I had chills, I cried and laughed and screamed This book is so necessary to any conversation on revenge, redemption, forgiveness, justice, and even atonement I am so thankful to Shane Claiborne for the work and research and hard conversations it took to make this.


  9. Michael Michael says:

    If you support the death penalty, I recommend you read this.


  10. William Horne William Horne says:

    This is a must read for everyone period The death penalty is one of the greatest evils in our world and the fact we continue to let it live should haunt us especially Christians Shane Claiborne does an excellent job laying out all the different angles of the death penalty and why we should say it s time to let death die.


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