The Cold War A Military History eBook ´ The Cold



10 thoughts on “The Cold War A Military History

  1. Jeff Jeff says:

    It no doubt would be difficult to write a single all enconmpassing book on the Cold War due to the complexities of the geopolitical struggle on a world wide stage David Miller focuses his book on Europe and the stand off between NATO and the Warsaw Pact There are certainly interesting descriptions of the diplomatic and political evolution of both NATO and the Warsaw Pact It gives a hint of the chaotic period immediately following World War II There are also discussions of major events from 1945 to 1989 such as the various Berlin crisies and the Pershing II missle deployment However these discussions are rather short to keep the volume to a manageable size What does occupy a significant amount of space is virtually an inventory of major weapons systems the two sides deployed over the years The laundry list of weapons and statistics sometimes bordered on tedium The author was obviously of the opinion that any conflict in Europe would uickly go nuclear Therefore considerable attention is placed on both tactical and strategic nucklear weapons and policies His use of unclassified official studies made for some interesting reading Tthe possible devastation to Europe wuold have been beyond wordsThe edition reviewed here was published in 1998 It would be interesting to update the volume with additional information available since then from Russian sources Events such as the 1983 Able Archer exercise would be an interesting addition to the bookI can recommend this book to true miliraty history aficionados especially those who served in the military and in Europe during the Cold War The casual reader I think would uickly get bored with the sterle analytical style


  2. Melvin Patterson Melvin Patterson says:

    Interesting discussions about the history and the strategic use of military weapons during the Cold War That said incredibly tedious There's an awful lot of detail about specific weapon systems and designs that lack any kind of context in the sense of military decision making and thought underlying adoption of weapon systems or the lack thereof It's like the author had a list of weapon and other systems he obtained from a FOIA or other government reuest and just slapped the list into the book without much thought or analysis The first part of the book really sets the stage for what was going on militarily and politically but after that the book kind of degenerates into a weapons inventory


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The Cold War A Military History From 1949 to 1991 the world was overshadowed by the Cold War Repeatedly it seemed that in days even hours global nuclear conflict would sweep away much of the United States the Soviet Union and Europe They would be obliterated in what President Carter described as 'one long final and very bleak afternoon' When the Cold War ended the Warsaw Pact was wound up and the vast military forces which had flourished for over forty years were disbanded As with all wars however it was only then that the realities of what had been involved began to emerge; indeed much has remained hidden until nowIn The Cold War David Miller discloses not only the vast scope of the military resources involved but also how nearly threat came to terrible reality Most chillingly of all he reveals that while the menace of nuclear war predominated it was actually little understood even by the experts The book examines each military area in turn covering the formation of the two great alliances and the strategies and major weapons in the rival navies armies and air forces That the Cold War ended without a conflict was due to professionalism on both sides The result Miller suggests would have impressed the Chinese military strategist Sun Tsu who writing in the fifth century BC said that 'to subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill'