Paperback Í Glass Cathedral eBook Ò

Glass Cathedral Definitely worth a read for a bittersweet evocation of young gay manhood in the 90s Relatedly a bittersweet evocation of young gay manhood that doesn t involve anyone dying How about that The protagonist is a young university student who meets James, a rich young bachelor about town, in an English tutorial I was particularly struck by the scene where James asks Colin if he s gay, and he reacts with horror and shock and shame, before they reconcile beautifully and start dating view spoi Definitely worth a read for a bittersweet evocation of young gay manhood in the 90s Relatedly a bittersweet evocation of young gay manhood that doesn t involve anyone dying How about that The protagonist is a young university student who meets James, a rich young bachelor about town, in an English tutorial I was particularly struck by the scene where James asks Colin if he s gay, and he reacts with horror and shock and shame, before they reconcile beautifully and start dating view spoiler Of course they were never gonna work out with an interesting twist that makes James Colin end inor less opposite positions in which they d started out, re closetedness hide spoiler Koh also has really interesting things to say about religion, gayness and class, with a sympathetic nod to the possibility of queer Chinese people and straight ethnic minorities finding meaning and solidarity in forming alliances with each other also, c mon, I couldn t be that broken up about view spoiler James and Colin breaking up because who else was totally gunning for Colin and Norbert to get together Andrew Koh was, that s for certain Norbert has his own flat now, a Chekov s gun re what that means for privacy, intimacy, and tenable queer and hetero, I suppose relationships in Singapore terms, hurrr hide spoiler Narrative style comes across very quotidian, yet it is precisely that style of voice that makes this story feel so true and unembellished The confusion experienced by the main character is brought through sensitively Andrew Koh delicately manages the tension between religion and LGBTQ identity, succeeding in humanising both sides with empathy and kindness. Finished it in one sitting And I love it The familiar settings of school, mates, family, crosstalk, singlish From both traditional families, we see Colin and James as educated sons struggling with university, society, love the unspoken kind , familial relations and its accompanied obligations They are by no means seen as traditional, they have the mobile opportunity to imagine a better life away from Singapore and its denial of their same sex love rights Where hetronomativity provides a gh Finished it in one sitting And I love it The familiar settings of school, mates, family, crosstalk, singlish From both traditional families, we see Colin and James as educated sons struggling with university, society, love the unspoken kind , familial relations and its accompanied obligations They are by no means seen as traditional, they have the mobile opportunity to imagine a better life away from Singapore and its denial of their same sex love rights Where hetronomativity provides a ghastly atmosphere in their love for each other What society deems normal, shows how Colin, James and Norbet are political victims in a society claiming to celebrate diversity on its own stated terms Even the other individual given the stage Rani is a minority, traditionally decked out But like Colin and Norbet is ever so worldly, compassionate and non judgmental I empathized with the protagonists as a gay men, we can be shamed into a life that is not genuine to us This book lighthearted as it may be is a sobering tale of what denial can easily be structured not for our own happiness but alas for others A peek into a devout Catholic s struggle with accepting and eventually expression of his own homosexual identity in early 1990s Singapore While many of the religious terms were lost on me raised closer to Taoist beliefs , I could understand the identity crisis Colin was going through from the author s descriptions of the fundamental Catholic s beliefs, as well as having grown up in Singapore The general hush hush, behind closed doors attitude Singaporeans generally have towards any kind of se A peek into a devout Catholic s struggle with accepting and eventually expression of his own homosexual identity in early 1990s Singapore While many of the religious terms were lost on me raised closer to Taoist beliefs , I could understand the identity crisis Colin was going through from the author s descriptions of the fundamental Catholic s beliefs, as well as having grown up in Singapore The general hush hush, behind closed doors attitude Singaporeans generally have towards any kind of sexual issues, unwillingness to acknowledge sex during our teens and yet vocally yearning for grandchildren a few years down the road definitely not healthy Compound that with the fear of being exposed as gay, the fear of being charged with our notorious Penal Code, I felt visceral trepidation the characters were forced to contend with Winner of the Singapore Literature Prize Commendation Award, Glass Cathedral s sensitive depiction of homosexuality in conservative Singapore is a landmark in local literature This novella was part of a small wave of gay and lesbian themed drama and fiction that appeared in Singapore during the early s ➽ [Download] ✤ Como fazer Investigação, Dissertações, Teses e relatórios By Maria José Sousa ➲ – 9facts.co.uk Glass Cathedral s sensitive depiction of homosexuality in conservative Singapore is a landmark in local literature This novella was part of a small wave of gay and lesbian themed drama and fiction that appeared in Singapore during the early s A really interesting and important book for its time in Singapore But it really could have benefited from an editor And the description of the nightclub was the most awkward, bizarre description of one that I have ever read Actual rating 3.5 Actual rating 3.5 Homosexuality and Catholicism in 1960s Singapore


About the Author: Andrew Koh

Andrew Koh is best known for his award winning novella Glass Cathedral, which won the 1994 Singapore Literature Prize Commendation Award Koh was a founding member of The Necessary Stage and has published various works, from academic papers to poetry He has also co authored several Literature textbooks for schools in Singapore.Koh read English Literature at the National University of Singapore and has worked in Singapore and London He now works in the healthcare sector and lives in Sydney.


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