Forgotten Voices Desert Victory PDF/EPUB Í Forgotten


  • Hardcover
  • 400 pages
  • Forgotten Voices Desert Victory
  • Julian Thompson
  • English
  • 02 May 2016
  • 9780091938574

10 thoughts on “Forgotten Voices Desert Victory

  1. Alastair Heffernan Alastair Heffernan says:

    This superb book describes the allied armies' defeat of the Axis forces in North Africa but with a twist Instead of 'yet another' history book recounting all the action and events drily this book instead begins each chapter with a couple of pages describing the outline of events and then walks through those events by piecing together excerpts from combatants who were there Not only is this an astonishing feat of editing but it offers a compelling and uniue way of really getting at what it was like to be there The generals often the focus of other histories are present of course but they are subordinate to the privates corporal lieutenants sergeants and captains whose diaries and letters are the primary source of the material And their accounts are riveting We follow certain individuals John Harding Peter Lewis and many others across hundreds of miles of the desert campaign I found myself looking forward to the next entry by a cast of individuals I'd grown familiar with There really is surprising continuity in the accounts The details themselves are as would be expected a mixture of the awful details of war anger inducing examples of organisational incompetence and a surprising amount of truly touching events particularly where enemies ensure their opponents make it away from an engagement in peace or receive medical attention There is also real humour in this hearing junior troops absolutely tear into senior officers is an absolute treat as is the stoic endurance and grim gallows humour on display throughoutThe book is not without faults however and this is what just led me to hold off on the five star review which is a shame as they would be easily fixed First the maps are atrocious Unless you are a true buff on this particular bit of the war you will struggle to follow the place names and movements of soldiers described I have no idea why the maps couldn't have been developed to have all the names mentioned in the chapters it would massively help with readability A second useful addition would be dates on the diary entries or letters even if approximate just to help orient the reader as to the rough timeline of what they are reading Lastly it would be an amazing addition if on the last entry for a particular soldier there was a brief synopsis of what they did afterwards such as where they fought or were prisoner of war and where they died These are frustrating niggles in an otherwise marvellous book I cannot recommend this highly enough for anyone interested in the human dimension of war


  2. Steph Steph says:

    My grandfather fought in the North African desert and told me many stories of his time as a soldier there and as a POW This book gave me a really good sense of what all these men went through and why the North African Campaign was so important to WW2 I loved that it was told by people who were actually there as this allowed for a true glimpse into the daily lives and horrors of the soldiers and battles they had to fight I also enjoyed coming across stories of compassion and sympathy by one side towards the other showing the humanity of those whose job it was to fight and kill total strangers An invaluable book that everyone who is interested in WW2 should read I wish there had been from German and Italian soldiers to provide insight from the other side but otherwise it was amazing I highly recommend it


  3. Matthew Ball Matthew Ball says:

    This book is a collection of interviews of veterans from the World War 2 North Africa campaighn covering it from start to finish from the perspectives of Allied Itallian and Afrika Korps soldiers Each chapter is introduced with a brief introduction of the historical events by the author such as El Alamein and Operation Torch alongside annotated maps of the battles and troop movements This was a really good addition to the “forgotten voices” series and for anyone interested in the North Africa campaighn already or new to WW2 history this provides a brilliant addition to literature already out there Well worth it


  4. Robert Hepple Robert Hepple says:

    Lost Voices Desert Victory is a series of recollections of the conflict in the North African theatre from mid 1940 to mid 1943 The recollections are sourced from the sound archive held by the IWM and conseuently are predominantly from the British perspective although a small number of Italian and German recollections are also included They are grouped into a series of chapters covering each element of the campaign Illustrations include around 60 black and white photographs some sourced from the people providing the recollections and others sourced from the IWM Each chapter also includes a basic map of the area fought over together with a summary of the operations covered by the chapter in order to place the recollections in the correct historical context The recollections themselves are often uite gritty and non pc and add uite a personal insight into the campaigns compared to the many other histories published A fantastic book and a must read for those interested in the Western Desert campaign of 1940 1943


  5. Paul Collard Paul Collard says:

    Fantastic book from a series that never fails to captivate and inform These are the tales that your Grandad would never tell; the real stories of what is was like to fight in WWII A fascinating insight into what it was like to fight in the desert war from how to brew a cup of army tea to the brutal reality of the swarming desert war that ground backwards and forwards across North Africa Some of the stories are so visceral that they bring you up short and I simply cannot comprehend how these great men managed to endure weeks and months of such fighting


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Forgotten Voices Desert Victory For Britain in the first half of World War II the importance of defending the Middle East against the Axis powers was second only to defending the homeland against invasion Had the Allies lost in North Africa the vital life line through the Suez Canal to Australia and India would have been cut More crucial was protecting the route to the oilfields of the Persian Gulf Without oil Britain could not fight The initial threat came from a large Italian Army who from their bases in Libya were uick to take British held ground in Egypt Yet the professional British soldiers along with tough all volunteer regiments from Australia and New Zealand easily defeated the poorly lead Italians Churchill confident that this front was secure transferred troops and euipment to Greece little realizing what the remaining troops would face when Rommel and his Panzer Division arrived With their armies fighting over vast distances on rugged terrain and supply lines often stretched to breaking point both Rommel and the then little known General Montgomery had to take huge tactical risks Good intelligence was vital so the elite Long Range Desert Group was formed capable of covert operations behind enemy lines David Stirling famously founded the SAS in the Western Desert trained to perform audacious sabotage missions Told in the voices of the men who were there this is the story of the Western Desert and how the Allies struck the first successful blow to Axis forces and achieved this remarkable Second World War victory


About the Author: Julian Thompson

Major General Julian Harold Atherdean Thompson CB OBE is a military historian and former Royal Marines officer who as a brigadier commanded 3 Commando Brigade during the Falklands warThompson who was British commander on the islands during the final phase of the conflict has written extensively on the Falklands conflict and British military history He is also a visiting professor at the depar